This website uses cookies to function correctly.
You may delete cookies at any time but doing so may result in some parts of the site not working correctly.

Self Help

coldWe are keen to help patients improve on self help and hope that the following information will offer some insight into that.

Take a look and see if you can improve your own understanding of your health and well-being! Please encourage others to look here too.

Here is a list of ailments that can be safely self managed. You will see that you can take a look via the hyperlink at the other websites which can offer you further information about managing your condition.

Common ailments that can be self managed :

Back pain

NHS Choices

Cold sores

NHS Choices

Common Cold

NHS Choices

Conjunctivitis

NHS Choices

pdfInformation Leaflet

Constipation

NHS Choices

Cough

NHS Choices

pdf Information Leaflet

Diarrhoea

NHS Choices

Dysmenorrhoea (painful periods)

NHS Choices

Earache

NHS Choices

Haemorrhoids

NHS Choices  

Hayfever

NHS Choices

Head lice

NHS Choices

Headache

NHS Choices

Heartburn & Indigestion

NHS Choices

Influenza

NHS Choices

pdf Information Leaflet

Insect bites

NHS Choices

Migraine

NHS Choices

Nasal congestion

NHS Choices

Nappy rash

NHS Choices

Sore throat

NHS Choices

pdf Information Leaflet

Sinusitis

NHS Choices

Sprains and strains

NHS Choices

Thrush

NHS Choices

Warts and Verrucas

NHS Choices

Step by step guide to managing infections

This useful pictorial guide to managing infection has been endorsed by a wide range of healthcare professionals and bodies including Public Health England, the Royal Pharmaceutical Society and the Royal College of Nursing. It offers easy-to-understand and clear advice on dealing with coughs, colds and sore throats and danger signs to look out for.


HANDi Paediatric Appstethoscope

New mobile app advises Devon parents on common childhood illnesses

NHS organisations in Devon have launched a new mobile app which will give parents in Devon up to date advice about common childhood illnesses and how to treat them. NHS Northern, Eastern and Western Devon Clinical Commissioning Group (NHS NEW Devon CCG), Northern Devon Healthcare NHS Trust (NDHT), the Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust (RD&E) and Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust (PHNT) have worked in partnership to launch the app.

P

logo-app_store   google-play
Devon links will appear in the App Store within the next couple of weeks (following Apple approval process) – to download to your desktop, please click on the link on the right hand side of this page and follow the instructions>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

The HANDi app – developed by Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust – is now available to download for free onto any Apple or Android smartphone or tablet. The app has been designed as a way to reduce the number of children and young people who visit A&E but need no treatment. It has been developed by paediatric consultants and will give parents access to home care plans, as well as GP and hospital clinical guidelines, for the most common childhood health care concerns. The app contains information about when and how to ask for help, along with what to expect when your child is being assessed.

Dr Shelagh McCormick, the CCG’s lead doctor for children and young people, said:

“We know parents generally don’t want to take their children to A&E unless it’s absolutely necessary – but often they end up there because they are not sure what else to do. We hope this app will give parents more confidence in dealing with the more minor conditions themselves at home.”

The conditions covered are:

  • Diarrhoea and vomiting
  • ‘Chesty baby’ illnesses such as:
    • Bronchiolitis
    • Asthma
    • Croup
  • ‘Chesty child’ illnesses such as:
    • Wheezing
    • Asthma
  • High temperature
  • Abdominal pain
  • Common newborn problems

The app takes parents through a series of questions about the symptoms their child is experiencing and then advises on the best course of action, whether that’s to treat at home, to make a GP appointment, to go to a minor injuries unit or walk-in centre, or to head to A&E.

Dr McCormick added: “Of course, parents will be advised to seek further help where necessary. This app is really about ensuring children are cared for in the most appropriate environment for their condition.”



Call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergencyNHS ChoicesThis site is brought to you by My Surgery Website